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Chicago Citation Guide

This guide is for anyone looking for help using the Chicago Manual of Style citation system.

Electronic books

Downloaded books  (14.166)

In Chicago style, a distinction is made between electronic books which are downloaded from a library or bookseller, versus those which are accessed online. If you are citing a downloaded ebook, the version you are using should be included in your citation, as per the following examples from the Chicago Manual of Style Online 16th edition:

Austen, Jane. Pride and Prejudice. New York: Penguin Classics, 2007. Kindle edition.
Austen, Jane. Pride and Prejudice. New York: Penguin Classics, 2008. PDF e-book.
Austen, Jane. Pride and Prejudice. New York: Penguin Classics, 2008. Microsoft Reader e-book.
Austen, Jane. Pride and Prejudice. New York: Penguin Classics, 2008. Palm e-book.

   

The following is an example of a book downloaded from the Mount Library's EBL collection:

             Abbott, Doug. Linux for Embedded and Real-Time Applications. 3rd ed. Burlington: Newnes, 2012. PDF e-book.
 

Books read online (14.167)

If you're citing the online version of a book, you must include the URL or DOI at the end of your citation as the following examples illustrate:

A book from the Mount Library's EBL collection, read online:

             Abbott, Doug. Linux for Embedded and Real-Time Applications. 3rd ed. Burlington: Newnes, 2012.
                   http://www.eblib.com

A book from the Mount Library's Springer collection, read online:
.
             Korzun, Dmitry and Andrei Gurtov. Structured Peer-to-Peer Systems: Fundamentals of Hierarchical Organization,
                    Routing, Scaling, and Security. New York: Springer, 2013. doi:10.1007/978-1-4614-5483-0.
 

Articles/Journals

Full-text article from an online database (14.184)

Note: while you can use either a DOI or a URL, a DOI is preferable. DOIs and URLs should appear at the end of the citation. If a URL is too long, you may abbreviate it at the first forward slash.

Orme, Nicholas. “Child's Play in Medieval England.” History Today 51, no. 10 (2001):          http://web.ebscohost.com/.
          

Online newspaper article (14.206)

Colley, Sherri Borden. "St. F.X. to Make Offer to Profs." Chronicle Herald, February 4, 2013.             http://thechronicleherald.ca/novascotia/622039-st-fx-to-make-offer-to-profs.

Websites

Websites  (14.245)

Websites are usually only cited in notes, but in a paper without notes they may be included in a bibliography. You should include a publication date, or the date on which the site was last modified. If this is unavailable, include an access date.

Health Canada. "Food and Nutrition." Last modified November 2, 2012. http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/index- 
         eng.php.

Online dictionaries and encyclopedias

Online reference books (14.247)

Well known reference books are usually not listed in bibliographies. Instead, they are cited in notes. See the Endnotes/Footnotes page for more on this.

However, some reference works (e.g. those with substantial author-entries) can be included in a bibliography. These citations are treated much like contributions to a multiauthored book, as per the example below:

Huffman, Carl. "Archytas." In Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Stanford University, 2012. Article revised July 25, 2011.
            http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/archytas/.
 

Need More Help?

For additional assistance with citation styles, consult your professor or reference staff at the Mount Library. 

You can reach the Library by email: library@msvu.ca or by phoning 457-6250.  Please note: library staff will help you as much as possible but they may also refer you back to your professor.


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